Google Canvas lets you annotate images!

American Progress (John Gast painting) Tom Mullaney, edtech guru, created a video introducing Google Canvas – you can use it on your laptop, your mobile device, or on a Chromebook. This is a great tool for students to use if they need to annotate an image. For example, when I taught American Literature and we talked about manifest destiny, I’d project an image of the paining called American Progress. Instead of asking students to find elements of our country’s progress as a group, squinting at the projector, I could have them open up a copy of the image and do their own annotations. To get to Google Canvas you need to type the url into the address bar on your browser – it’s not an app: canvas.apps.chrome

Here’s the video Mullaney created with the details:

Did you know about the secret menu?

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Everything Matt Miller writes about on his website, tweets about from his Twitter, or speaks about from his…mouth?…is amazing, but sometimes his stuff is so good that I can’t digest it in one sitting.

Such is the case with this entry called “The ‘Secret Menu’ for Google Slides, Docs, Drawings, and More.” I used the first tip – how to save a photo that’s been placed in a Google Doc – when my journalism students submitted photos with their stories, ignoring instructions to place .jpg versions of the photos in a folder I’d shared with them. To save myself the headache of emailing 22 people (and waiting for 22 responses), I followed these instructions and snagged the photos myself. Life changing! I use the second tip constantly, am not sure how I’d use the third, and the fourth is on my to-do list for January.

He published this article in October. It’s going to take awhile to absorb all of these tips, but whew! What a great collection of ideas!

 

Add narration to your Google Slides

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You don’t need to use screencasting software to narrate a Google Slides presentation. Just get the AudioPlayer for Slides extension and add existing audio or record your own. You can create one long audio track for the whole presentation, or you can break it up slide by slide. Here’s a how-to article from the extension’s creators.

Screencasting made easy!

Soapbox is an easy-to-use, yet robust extension that allows you to create a screencast where you share the screen with what you’re doing on your desktop. When you’re done recording, you can toggle between your image full-screen, your desktop full-screen, or a split screen. Try creating one for a project or paper introduction and keep it on your Google Classroom page for people who were absent or who want to hear the instructions again!