How to create a final exam in Google Docs

I had a visitor recently ask me how to touch up the formatting on a Microsoft Word document after he converted it to Google Docs. Unfortunately, the formatting options for Docs are pretty limited. This YouTube video shows you a quick overview of how to get numbers and letter choices to align – it helped me out, maybe it will help you as you create your final exams!

Create bookmark collections with your class – or just yourself!

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I am newly in love. With Wakelet. You can create groups (“Politics” – “Differentiated Learning” – whatever you want!) and then, as you come across interesting articles or websites online, you can use the handy Wakelet extension to add them to your collection! But it’s not only bookmarks you can save – here’s a (partial?) list:

  • Links
  • Images
  • PDFs
  • YouTube videos
  • Tweets
  • Facebook & Instagram posts
  • Google files of any sort (docs, sheets, etc.)
  • Spotify or Soundcloud playlists
  • Flipgrid responses
  • Screencast recordings (on your favorite screencasting tool)

Students can create groups as they work on projects together, or you can make a class group and allow everyone to add to it. I made a sample group here for the Crossroads satire edition.

Let me know if you have questions, or check out their help site!

Ditch That Textbook gives guidance for the end of the year

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Looking to shake things up and have your students create a project as an end-of-the-semester assessment? As usual, Matt Miller is full of ideas. Check out his post called “10 ideas for digital end-of-semester final projects” for inspiration!

Hipster Google 2 has dropped!

 

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Hipster Google 2: More Google Tools You Probably Never Heard Of is the sequel to the popular-in-edtech-circles Hipster Google. There are twenty-two Google-based ideas in this post, but there’s something for everyone! Music teachers! Science teachers! Math teachers! Humanities teachers! ALL THE TEACHERS. My two favorites are Just a Line, an augmented reality app for your phone (iOS or Android) that lets you draw on your environment, and LIFE Tags, which gives students quick access from the LIFE magazine photo database from 1936-2000. (In my heart, I lived through World War II and the Great Depression. My favorite periodical is Reminisce magazine.) Set aside a few minutes to explore here! Your students will thank you!

A challenger to Quizlet Live!

downloadOne of the (many) new websites I learned about at ICE this week is a game created by a high school student called Gimkit. It’s very similar to Quizlet Live in that students compete on a leader board as they progress through the game, but it differs in that they can use strategies to place bets and earn rewards as they get answers correct. It’s kind of like the part of Jeopardy! where the contestants have to decide how much to wager on themselves (and I would lose all of my money if I were playing because that part is beyond me). But students will love the thrill of accumulating points by taking chances! The video below is from a Spanish teacher who takes you through both the teacher set up (very easy) and the student screen as he plays. If you’re giving it a try, please invite me in! Maybe someone can teach me how to bet!

Give a locked-browser quiz through Google forms without using Hapara!

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If you’d like students to take a quiz in Google forms, but would like to remove any temptations they may have to click away, use the new setting that Google just rolled out. No need to get Hapara involved for this – it’s built right into the form creation! Read about it in this post from Teaching Forward.