A challenger to Quizlet Live!

downloadOne of the (many) new websites I learned about at ICE this week is a game created by a high school student called Gimkit. It’s very similar to Quizlet Live in that students compete on a leader board as they progress through the game, but it differs in that they can use strategies to place bets and earn rewards as they get answers correct. It’s kind of like the part of Jeopardy! where the contestants have to decide how much to wager on themselves (and I would lose all of my money if I were playing because that part is beyond me). But students will love the thrill of accumulating points by taking chances! The video below is from a Spanish teacher who takes you through both the teacher set up (very easy) and the student screen as he plays. If you’re giving it a try, please invite me in! Maybe someone can teach me how to bet!

Give a locked-browser quiz through Google forms without using Hapara!

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If you’d like students to take a quiz in Google forms, but would like to remove any temptations they may have to click away, use the new setting that Google just rolled out. No need to get Hapara involved for this – it’s built right into the form creation! Read about it in this post from Teaching Forward.

Google Canvas lets you annotate images!

American Progress (John Gast painting) Tom Mullaney, edtech guru, created a video introducing Google Canvas – you can use it on your laptop, your mobile device, or on a Chromebook. This is a great tool for students to use if they need to annotate an image. For example, when I taught American Literature and we talked about manifest destiny, I’d project an image of the paining called American Progress. Instead of asking students to find elements of our country’s progress as a group, squinting at the projector, I could have them open up a copy of the image and do their own annotations. To get to Google Canvas you need to type the url into the address bar on your browser – it’s not an app: canvas.apps.chrome

Here’s the video Mullaney created with the details:

Did you know about the secret menu?

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Everything Matt Miller writes about on his website, tweets about from his Twitter, or speaks about from his…mouth?…is amazing, but sometimes his stuff is so good that I can’t digest it in one sitting.

Such is the case with this entry called “The ‘Secret Menu’ for Google Slides, Docs, Drawings, and More.” I used the first tip – how to save a photo that’s been placed in a Google Doc – when my journalism students submitted photos with their stories, ignoring instructions to place .jpg versions of the photos in a folder I’d shared with them. To save myself the headache of emailing 22 people (and waiting for 22 responses), I followed these instructions and snagged the photos myself. Life changing! I use the second tip constantly, am not sure how I’d use the third, and the fourth is on my to-do list for January.

He published this article in October. It’s going to take awhile to absorb all of these tips, but whew! What a great collection of ideas!