Create bookmark collections with your class – or just yourself!

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I am newly in love. With Wakelet. You can create groups (“Politics” – “Differentiated Learning” – whatever you want!) and then, as you come across interesting articles or websites online, you can use the handy Wakelet extension to add them to your collection! But it’s not only bookmarks you can save – here’s a (partial?) list:

  • Links
  • Images
  • PDFs
  • YouTube videos
  • Tweets
  • Facebook & Instagram posts
  • Google files of any sort (docs, sheets, etc.)
  • Spotify or Soundcloud playlists
  • Flipgrid responses
  • Screencast recordings (on your favorite screencasting tool)

Students can create groups as they work on projects together, or you can make a class group and allow everyone to add to it. I made a sample group here for the Crossroads satire edition.

Let me know if you have questions, or check out their help site!

Google Canvas lets you annotate images!

American Progress (John Gast painting) Tom Mullaney, edtech guru, created a video introducing Google Canvas – you can use it on your laptop, your mobile device, or on a Chromebook. This is a great tool for students to use if they need to annotate an image. For example, when I taught American Literature and we talked about manifest destiny, I’d project an image of the paining called American Progress. Instead of asking students to find elements of our country’s progress as a group, squinting at the projector, I could have them open up a copy of the image and do their own annotations. To get to Google Canvas you need to type the url into the address bar on your browser – it’s not an app: canvas.apps.chrome

Here’s the video Mullaney created with the details:

A touch-screen, shareable white board? Sign me up!

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A year ago, I couldn’t find an online touch-screen whiteboard for our math teachers to use in class, so this discovery is good news! Using the free version of AwwApp, people can draw, type, or add shapes to a whiteboard using their mouse or the touch screen – and they can invite collaborators to join in on their sketch. Once done, you can download it as a PDF or as an image file. The sketchboard will disappear after two hours with the free version – and you can’t upload any PDFs or images to draw on – but it seems like something that may be useful for all classes, not just math!

Google Keep

I use the Notepad function on my iPhone when I need to jot things down, but that doesn’t help me when I’m on my laptop. Google Keep, however, syncs with Chrome…so it’s on every device I use! And I can create notes to share with specific people, and the notes can have links! Images! Fun things! If you’re interested, look at this aesthetically-pleasing article, “How to Conquer Productivity With Google Keep” – or check out the video below.

Looking for a video editor?

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YouTube is discontinuing its built-in video editor, but there are still ways for your students to create movies using their Chromebooks! Try Adobe Spark or WeVideo. If you want the more robust, premium version of WeVideo for your classes, let me know, and I will get you a class subscription! WeVideo integrates nicely with Google Classroom (see below).