Come see me at ICE!

ICE Presenter Badge.jpgCome see me present on creating an instructional technology website that has evolved with our school’s 1:1 program. The ICE conference is the best there is (better than ISTE in my opinion) – and it’s not just for tech coaches! Teachers in every discipline will find a session that speaks to them. Check out the class offerings and sign up before Feb. 1 for earlybird pricing!

Want something a little more low key? The regional ICE chapter is having a one-day conference on January 26…and if you look at the list of sessions, you’ll find one led by our own Greg Schwab!

Use Sorc’d to save and share online information

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I often encounter websites that contain information I’d like to share with my class at some point in the future. An easy way to catalog and store that information is by using the Sorc’d extension and add-on. After installing Sorc’d to your Chrome browser and to your Google Docs (see this how-to page for directions – it’s easy!), you’re ready to use it whenever the mood strikes! Here’s a quick video that shows me saving something I read in an NPR story:

Use photographs across all disciplines

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The New York Times just published their Year in Pictures feature, which can be a great tool to aid discussion in almost any discipline. People are visual – their eyes naturally land on photos over text when presented with a website (or a magazine page) that contains both. Showing these powerful images in class, and tying them content you are teaching, could be a memorable lesson. How are shadows created? Where do we see real-life axis points? How do different cultures engage in protest? The possibilities are endless!

 

Google Canvas lets you annotate images!

American Progress (John Gast painting) Tom Mullaney, edtech guru, created a video introducing Google Canvas – you can use it on your laptop, your mobile device, or on a Chromebook. This is a great tool for students to use if they need to annotate an image. For example, when I taught American Literature and we talked about manifest destiny, I’d project an image of the paining called American Progress. Instead of asking students to find elements of our country’s progress as a group, squinting at the projector, I could have them open up a copy of the image and do their own annotations. To get to Google Canvas you need to type the url into the address bar on your browser – it’s not an app: canvas.apps.chrome

Here’s the video Mullaney created with the details: